SARE: Southeast Asian Review of English is an international peer-reviewed journal founded in 1980. It publishes scholarly articles, interviews, reviews, and other valuable and lively interventions.

Serving solely as an open access electronic journal from 2016, SARE aims to be a key critical forum for original research and fresh conversations from all over the world on the literatures, languages, and cultures of Southeast, South, and East Asia. It particularly welcomes theoretically-informed articles on the literary and other cultural productions of these regions.

SARE has been committed from its inception to featuring new or unpublished poems and short fiction.  

SPECIAL ISSUE ON ASIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION: VOL. 57, NO. 1, JULY 2020

2019-09-30

 

                                      

                                        EXTENDED DEADLINE

CALL FOR PAPERS: SPECIAL ISSUE ON ASIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION

Vol. 57, No. 1, July 2020

Guest Editors: Susan Philip and Surinderpal Kaur

 

“Re-visions and Re-imaginations in Asian Speculative Fiction”

Speculative fiction of all kinds has long been seen as something of a niche market, the purview of nerds and small fandom communities. More recently, however, there has been an upsurge of interest in the genre, as well as an increase in the number of subgenres within speculative fiction. Apart from the more traditional epic fantasy, sci-fi and horror, we now see dystopia, paranormal romance, urban fantasy, zombies, steampunk, magic realism, gothic, horror and so on as subgenres within this growing field of research and academic interest.

Part of this increasing popularity and diversity has to do with society’s fears, hopes, desires, dreams, nightmares. As Bruce Sterling points out, “A genre arises out of some deeper social need; a genre is not some independent floating construct” (2011). Much as these works represent vast leaps of the imagination and, often, wholesale invention, they are grounded in some “deeper social need”, and are therefore in some way expressive of the conditions of society. This idea is emphasized by Margaret Atwood, who contends that her own speculative fiction “invents nothing we haven’t already invented or started to invent” (2005).

Works of speculative fiction address or embody questions that affect us, even when dressed up in the seemingly medieval garb of epic fantasy, or the futuristic space stations of science fiction. Because speculative fiction is not tied to the strict demands of realism, it enables us to play with reality in exciting ways. It may help us to examine pressing and urgent questions, while allowing for critical distance, or to explore and expand our mythologies, dreams and legends, or to highlight and focus on that which is not dominant or mainstream.

In line with the potential of speculative fiction to shine a light on the margins, this special issue will focus on speculative fiction with a strong Asian connection. It could be written by Asian authors, be set in Asia, make use of Asian mythologies, feature Asian lead characters. The sub-genres to be covered include (but are not limited to) fantasy, science fiction, horror, gothic, dystopia, steampunk, and magic realism.

We invite papers that explore the interweavings of alternative and, even, radical possibilities of imagined futures as well as the re-imagination of current socio-political metanarratives. We also invite short fiction or poetry, as well as reviews of Asian speculative fiction.

 Some of the issues that could be explored are speculative re-visionings of:

  • Language
  • Race
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Technologizing Asianness/Orientalism/Race
  • The Asian body and (dis)ability
  • Belonging and marginality
  • Nostalgia
  • Migration
  • Environment
  • Power
  • Medicine
  • Justice
  • History
  • War

This special issue will be guest edited by Associate Professor Susan Philip (marys@um.edu.my) and Dr Surinderpal Kaur (surinder@um.edu.my). Abstracts (maximum 200 words) with a short bio (of up to 50 words) are to be sent to The Editor, SARE at sarejournal@gmail.com (with a copy to the Guest Editors at marys@um.edu.my and surinder@um.edu.my). Our call for abstracts has been extended to 30 November 2019.

Decision notifications will be sent from 1-5 December 2019. 

The deadline for the submission of full papers (6000-7000 words) is 15 March 2020. Submissions should be in English and uploaded to the SARE website through the “Make a Submission” portal at https://sare.um.edu.my. 

Further submission guidelines can be found on our website.

Publication date: July 2020

About our Guest Editors: 

SUSAN PHILIP is an Associate Professor in the Department of English, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur. Her main area of interest is Malaysian English-language theatre. She has several publications in this field, in journals such as the Asian Theatre Journal, World Literature Written in English, Australasian Drama Studies and Journal of Commonwealth Literature. Her research interests have expanded to include crime fiction, digital media, and community theatre, as well as ideas of culture and heritage. She has published on digital media in Asiatic, and on community theatre in Kajian Malaysia, and on crime fiction in SARE and International Journal of Indonesian Studies.

SURINDERPAL KAUR is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Language, Faculty of Languages and Linguistics at Universiti Malaya. Her research interests are in gender, sexuality and language, political discourse, social media communication, and migrant issues.

 

If you have any questions related to the special issue, please direct your inquiries to The Editor, SARE at sarejournal@gmail.com or spgabriel@um.edu.my.

  

Vol 56 No 1 (2019): SOUTHEAST ASIAN REVIEW OF ENGLISH (JULY 2019)

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorial: Openness

Sharmani Patricia Gabriel, Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

 

SPECIAL ISSUE: LIT UP ASIA-PACIFIC FESTIVAL 2018

GUEST EDITORS: CHRIS MOONEY-SINGH AND SCOTT GRANT 

Introduction: The Silk Road of Ideas 

Chris Mooney-Singh and Scott Grant, LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

 

Articles 

Triadic Interplay: A Model of Transforming Literature into Wayang Theatre

I Nyoman Sedana,  Institut Seni Indonesia (Indonesian Institute of the Arts), Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia

 

Balagtasan Beyond Balagtas: Debate Poetry, a Filipino Tradition

Victor Emmanuel Carmelo D. Nadera Jr and Chris Mooney-Singh, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, the Philippines and LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore

 

Translation as Style and Technique in the Hybrid Englishes of Raja Rao's Kanthapura and Eileen Chang's Lust, Caution

Sreedhevi Iyer, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia

 

Harold Stewart’s Autumn Landscape Roll, the "Buddhist Divine Comedy" 

Chris Mooney-Singh, LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore

 

Interview

Arts and Education in Virtual Worlds: In Conversation with Bernhard Drax, Scott Grant, Jay Jay Jegathesan and Chris Mooney-Singh

Savinder Kaur, The Writers Centre, Singapore

 

Stories, Poems, Plays

The Stained Window

Uma Jayaraman,  National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

The Boy With the Boar's Head Face

Chris Mooney-Singh, LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore

 

First Date

Moving House

What My Net Dragged To The Surface

Chen Cuifen, Singapore

 

A Celebration

Bindi

A Conversation

Priyanka Srivastava, Singapore

 

Sekala Niskala at the Tanjung Sari

Peter Morgan, Singapore 

 

Plastic Water Bottles

Trip Advisor

Darryl Whetter,  LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore

  

Pointing at the Moon 

Sonnet for Ah Gong

There are No Magpies

Valerie Ang, Singapore 

 

Water, City, Sky

Kirpal Singh, Singapore

 

Naturalism

Tay Kai Xin Ranice, Singapore

 

Chain Reaction 

Olivier Castaignède, Singapore 

 

 

GENERAL SECTION

Articles

Literature and Postcolonial Capitalism in Contemporary Vietnam: Indian Characters in Hồ Anh Thái’s Writings

Chi P. Pham, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, Hà Nội, Vietnam & University of Hamburg, Germany

  

Poetry

A Barber's Tale

John Thieme, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

 

Home is a Three Syllable Word

Anitha Devi Pillai, National Institute of Education, Singapore

 

Siam: Four Poems

John Charles Ryan, University of New England, Armidale, Australia

 

Advice for a friend on his first visit to Macau

Prabhu Guptara, United Kingdom

 

Book Reviews

John Thieme, Paco's Atlas and Other Poems

Marta Dvořák, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France

 

K. Kesavapany with Anitha Devi Pillai, From Estate to Embassy: Memories of an Ambassador

Asad Latif, Singapore

  

Guido Mazzoni, Theory of the Novel 

Nicholas O. Pagan, Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

 

Tash Aw,  We, the Survivors

Andrew Hock Soon Ng, Monash University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

 

Sharifah Aishah Osman and Tutu Dutta (eds), Principal Girl: Feminist Tales from Asia

Alicia Izharuddin, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard University, USA 

 

Notes on Contributors 

Published: 2019-07-22

Editorial: “Openness”

Sharmani Patricia Gabriel

i-iii

Introduction: The Silk Road of Ideas

Chris Mooney-Singh, Scott Grant

1-10

Balagtasan Beyond Balagtas: Debate Poetry, a Filipino Tradition

Victor Emmanuel Carmelo D. Nadera Jr, Chris Mooney-Singh

26-44

The Stained Window

Uma Jayaraman

94-101

Water, City, Sky

Kirpal Singh

121

Naturalism

Tay Kai Xin Ranice

122-125

Chain Reaction

Olivier Castaignède

126-137

A Barber’s Tale

John Thieme

156-159

Home is a Three Syllable Word

Anitha Devi Pillai

160-161

Siam: Four Poems

John Charles Ryan

162-165

Tash Aw, We, the Survivors

Andrew Hock Soon Ng

177-179

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

Southeast Asian Review Of English

182-190

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ISSN 0127-046X | Affiliated with the Council of Editors of Learned Journals

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